Electric Vehicle Readiness Ordinance Introduced in SF

News

The City and County of San Francisco’s Department of the Environment is excited to share that Mayor Ed Lee and Supervisor Katy Tang introduced an Electric Vehicle Readiness Ordinance. The EV Readiness Ordinance strives to eliminate cost barriers to EV charging deployment in existing construction by requiring electrical capacity and supporting infrastructure to be in place at time of new construction or major renovation in order to meet the growing demand for EV charging.

The documents at the end of this post including the staff brief and cost effectiveness analysis may be particularly valuable to other municipalities pursuing such an ordinance.

If you are interested in learning more about this ordinance you can contact Jessie.Denver@sfgov.org.

Ordinance summary:

  • Overall Electrical Capacity:Size electrical infrastructure (electrical service, panels, etc.) to simultaneously charge vehicles in 20% of parking spaces. With this capacity, load management systems can readily be installed later (voluntarily) which afford the option to cost-effectively extend EV charging, up to 100% of parking spaces.
  • Turnkey EV Readinessin 10% of parking spaces: Support today’s EV market by installing full circuits to enable simple installation and activation of standard Level 2 chargers.
  • Flexible EVReadiness in an additional 10% of spaces: Install conduit from electrical panel(s) to each parking space, enabling easy installation of Level 2 chargers and flexibility to upgrade selected circuits to higher amperage if requested by residents/occupants.
  • All remaining spaces EV Capable: To maximize opportunity for expansion, require project plans to indicate the path of future wiring to each parking space. Install only conduit, and only in locations that are far more economical to access in new construction – such as trenches, concrete wall penetrations, etc.
  • Flexibility:Allow installation of “fast chargers” to reduce the number of EV Ready spaces required, since a fast charger can “fuel” a larger number of vehicles.

Supporting documents:

·         EV Ready Draft Ordinance Introduced February 28

·         EV Ready SF Environment Staff Brief

·         EV Ready Legislative Digest

·         EV infrastructure cost effectiveness analysis

·         BEVs and San Francisco Market Context – Slides

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